AEF Saguaro Cactus Project

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Saguaro Cactus Project

The Saguaro (scientific name Carnegiea gigantea) is a large,
tree-sized cactus species in the monotypic genus Carnegiea.
It is native to the Sonoran Desert in the U.S. state of Arizona,
the Mexican state of Sonora, a small part of Baja California in
the San Felipe Desert and an extremely small area of California,
U.S. The saguaro blossom is the State Wildflower of Arizona.

The Saguaro cactus called the “Grand One,” near Carefree, Arizona, and estimated to be more than 200 years old was burned in the Cave Creek Complex fire and may not survive. It was once the largest Saguaro in the world. The fire has burned more than 214,000 acres of the Sonoran Desert.

AEF Saguaro Cactus Project will allow the future leaders of our community “our children” will a play a vital role in helping to restore the amazing Saguaro cactus throughout Arizona. AEF will work with schools, young groups in the Adopt Saguaro Program. AEF is working with a local grower and will have hundreds of local 1 – 2 year old Saguaros for the project. AEF will be working with local, state, federal management agencies as well a private land orders via our “Conservation through Participation” program for planting locations.

Our kids will play a vital role in re-establishing the Saguaro cactus in areas heavily damaged by fires, poaching and lands altered by human activities.

This is a grass root project and with AEF’s success in the Sierra/Nevada – Jeffrey Pine Project and the California Central Coast – Coast Live Oak Project we know this will be a very successful project.

AEF is always looking for project partners, volunteers, and project support so we would love to hear from you.

AEF Saguaro Cactus Project info:
Richard Van Dyke
888 USA-GREEN  or  888 872-4733
rvandyke@usagreeen.org

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Help Support this Project.

Every LED Dog Collar and Leash we sell helps plant a Saguaro Cactus

List of Local Tucson Stores Carrying LED Collars and Leashes

 

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Water Drought – The World Agricultural Expo.

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The World Agricultural Expo.

The largest Farm Equipment show in the world this week was a window into the frantic struggle to fight the devastating effects of the drought, and how to improve water irrigation efficiency and achieve better crop yields in the coming growing seasons.

Comments coming from those attending focused on growers looking for more efficient irrigation practices to minimize irrigation waste, and boost crop yields and quality.

California’s $45 billion agriculture sector consumes some 80% of the states water supply.
The need to use available water sources more efficiently has driven greater interest in Drip-Irrigation in areas using other irrigation methods.

California has much room to improve, according to Claire O’Connor of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Data shows that more than half of the state 7.3 irrigated acres rely on water-intensive “flood irrigation” which uses 35% more water than even basic sprinkler irrigation.

Growers need to be thinking long-term, about what kind of irrigation equipment they will need to invest in. The amount of water needed to grow 1 stalk lettuce is 1.5 gallons, where the amount to produce a patty of beef could be as much as 616 gallons.

California drought a ‘train wreck’ for Central Valley farms

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Water experts say many farmers who depend on the huge water source beneath the valley for irrigation will have to resort to pumping water from ever deeper levels at greater costs, even as they plant crops on fewer and fewer acres.

David Perlman San Francisco Chronicle  Feb. 10, 2014

California Drought – Not Good News

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The World Agricultural Expo.

The largest Farm Equipment show in the world this week was a window into the frantic struggle to fight the devastating effects of the drought, and how to improve water irrigation efficiency and achieve better crop yields in the coming growing seasons.

Comments coming from those attending focused on growers looking for more efficient irrigation practices to minimize irrigation waste, and boost crop yields and quality.

California’s $45 billion agriculture sector consumes some 80% of the states water supply.

The need to use available water sources more efficiently has driven greater interest in Drip-Irrigation in areas using other irrigation methods.

California has much room to improve, according to Claire O’Connor of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Data shows that more than half of the state 7.3 irrigated acres rely on water-intensive “flood irrigation” which uses 35% more water than even basic sprinkler irrigation.

Growers need to be thinking long-term, about what kind of irrigation equipment they will need to invest in. The amount of water needed to grow 1 stalk lettuce is 1.5 gallons, where the amount to produce a patty of beef could be as much as 616 gallons. – Tulare, California Feb. 11, 2014

California drought a ‘train wreck’ for Central Valley farms

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Water experts say many farmers who depend on the huge water source beneath the valley for irrigation will have to resort to pumping water from ever deeper levels at greater costs, even as they plant crops on fewer and fewer acres.

David Perlman San Francisco Chronicle  Feb. 10, 2014

Critter Joe’s Plant Trees!

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The American Evergreen Foundation has teamed with Critter Joe’s who offers online pet products and supplies. The plan is simple as can be; Critter Joe’s is matching AEF on every online sale with the goal to plant a tree with ever purchase. Raising funds for important environmental projects is very challenging in a world where the environment is taken for granted.  AEF’s Conservation through Participation projects brings people and communities together with projects that educate and at the same time, in this case plants trees which we all benefit from.

The team at AEF wants to thank and welcome Critter Joe’s Pet World and look forward to building a strong and long lasting relationship.

AEF looking for a few Vechicle Donations for Projects

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Everything helps and with up coming tree planting projects The American Evergreen Foundation (AEF) is reaching out looking for a donation of a trailer, RV, camper to aid for on site projects. AEF Conservation through Participation programs from time to time seek out equipment, vehicles, etc., to aid projects. Anytime we receive a vehicle donation it’s a big step forward for AEF who is a 100% volunteer staff and crew. We utilize all we can get and in this case we need to establish a mobile project unit, as well as seeking out a few support vehicles.

We make all vehicle donations as simple as possible and cover the cost of a independent appraiser so the donor has all documentation for a tax deduction.

To learn more about donating a vehicle or other equipment in support of conservation programs visit American Evergreen Foundation Donation Programs